counterpunches:

mydadisindianajones:

americanhobbit:

nudiemuse:

amaradonis:

girlslovegamestoo:

Women of Steel

deep, heavy breathing

Give me armour and let me kill some shit.

pay special attention to the lack of boob cups and thank you

istg I want to BE THEM

(via ouijayesforyouiwill)

audreyhepburncomplex:

oldsmokeys1947 LIFE Magazine fashion feature. Photos by Nina Leen.

(via gotnolifekindasummer)

brokje:

divinedorothy:

do you ever think about how fucked you’d be in medieval times with your weak eyesight, asthma and homosexual tendencies

(via literaryreference)

acceber74:

unrepentantauthor:

masterofbirds:

did-you-kno:

Hawaii was first called the Sandwich Islands.

Source

Pretty sure it was first called  NiʻihauKauaʻiOʻahuMolokaʻiLānaʻiKahoʻolaweMaui and Hawaiʻi.

The earliest habitation supported by archaeological evidence dates to as early as 300 CE, whereas the 1778 arrival of British explorer James Cook was Hawaiʻi’s first documented contact with European explorers. Cook named the islands the “Sandwich Islands” in honor of his sponsor John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich.

Because things only exist when Europeans discover them smh

This. ffs

image

(via pocket-sloths)

queerkhmer:

As the debate on same-sex marriage continues in Western nations, including the United States, Thailand could become the first country in Asia to legalize gay marriage. Thailand is known for its liberal acceptance of sexuality, but the draft same-sex marriage law is not without controversy. This is a traditional Thai wedding, except there is no groom. There are two brides. This ceremony is only symbolic because Thailand, like all of Asia, does not recognize same sex marriage. But a draft law later this year could change that and make Thailand the first Asian nation to legalize gay marriage. Nonetheless, Arisa Thanommek and her partner Pacharee Hungsabut say they were not interested in waiting. “We…we [will] not wait. Because we [are] ready.  Our family is ready,” she said

I noticed that women of color are one of the biggest spearheads of recognizing LGBTQ relationships. Happy Pride Month to Thailand!

(Source: ilga.org, via literaryreference)

Things To Remember

wittyandcharming:

  • Don’t be angry at yourself when anxiety/depression flares up. It isn’t your fault and no one blames you and if they do they’re pieces of shit.
  • Don’t orbit around your perceived value so much. You’re not the sum total of what you produce.
  • Don’t let yourself wonder why people love you. That’s not how it works. There are not stark, individual reasons that a person can enumerate about why they love you. It’s the entire, unique combination of what and who you are.

(via peachy-strawberry)

,,

When people say ‘This is my baby,’ they don’t always mean a baby. Sometimes they mean a dog.

A Somali student, on what has surprised her most about the United States. (via africandogontheprairie)

(via plantgender)

bunmer:

redhester:

bunmer:

A young Jewish refugee with her Chinese playmates. Shanghai, China (x)

Between 1933 and 1941, it is estimated that 20,000 Jews escaped persecution by fleeing to the Chinese port of Shanghai. Shanghai was one of the few places in the world that would accept Jewish refugees at this time, Japan being another.

i am furious that i am just now learning about this important fact.

Because it has nothing to do with the USA being the superhero and saving all the Jews

(via plantgender)

geminiio:

i need ferguson to go down in history books. i need school children in the year 2074 to learn about michael brown being shot on august 9th, 2014 by officer darren wilson. i need this to spark a movement. this can not lose the focus of society a mere month after it happened. 

(via plantgender)

scissorsandthread:

Fall Gift Wrap & Tags | Lia Griffith

I’ve got Lia’s site bookmarked for anytime I need to wrap a gift. Her colours and patterns are gorgeous and any person who I’ve gifted with her wrap have commented on it. This is one of my favourite colour combos - plum, navy and pumpkin.

seriouslyamerica:

I have so many feelings about the US higher education system.

  • It’s ridiculous to expect a 17-year-old to know what they want to do with the rest of their life.
  • It’s even more absurd to ask them to gamble their entire financial future on this decision.
  • The children of the rich are at a huge advantage here (as they are everywhere) as they can afford to take 5 or more years to finish, switching majors if/when their interests change, and they don’t have to take any paying job they can upon graduation, as they don’t have to worry about loans coming due.
  • We’re told to get a degree so we can get a job, but getting a degree (even an advanced degree) is no guarantee of employment.
  • Students are encouraged to attend the best *name* school that will accept them, and then berated when they have to take out loans to attend.
  • OR they go the cheapest route and are treated as less than because they don’t have the *name* school pedigree.
  • Basically everything you can learn in university classes you can learn from reading for free at a public library, and discussing online or in person - you can even listen to university lectures free with streaming services like iTunes - but the learning doesn’t matter, the paper does.
  • Graduating college is a class/status symbol, not proof that graduates actually engaged with the material or learned critical thinking. It’s certainly not a predictor of who will work hard or excel in their careers.

internal-acceptance-movement:

HOW TO TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF AFTER A LAPSE

1. Recognize that lapsing is a normal part of recovery. 

I don’t say that to justify lapsing or use as a cop out when things get difficult. I say it as a reminder that your recovery doesn’t have to be perfect in order to produce results. That said, no one’s recovery is perfect. Everyone has set backs and struggles. Everyone makes mistakes, messes up, and reverts to old behaviors — not because they’re weak or incapable, but because recovery is really, really difficult. Your behaviors helped you cope with trauma and incredible emotional pain. They allowed you to numb out and they kept you afloat when you felt like you were drowning. Letting go of something that helped you survive for so long is not easy. And it doesn’t happen over the course of a few days or months. It’s terrifying, painful, incredibly challenging, and it takes time. So be compassionate with yourself and your process. You’re doing the best you can to fight this and recover and it’s all you can ask of yourself. 

2. Use the lapse as a learning experience. 

You can’t go back in time and change the fact that you lapsed, but you can choose how you respond to it. You can wallow in self-pity, beat yourself up, and use what happened as an excuse to continue using behaviors. Or you can choose to use what happened as a learning experience. You can look at the lapse as an opportunity to collect important information about what triggers you to use behaviors and what you need in the moment to avoid a future lapse. 

3. Be curious.

Judging yourself for having a lapse doesn’t get you anywhere. It makes you feel worse and it keeps you stuck. Instead of feeding the cycle of self-hatred, treat yourself with compassionate curiosity and start asking questions:

What need did you have in the moment that wasn’t being met? Were you feeling lonely? Sad? Depressed? Angry? Hurt? Disappointed? Rejected? Invisible? Inadequate? When you turned to behaviors to cope, what were you really looking for? Did you need to feel safe? Did you need a way to express your feelings? Did you need to feel seen and heard? Did you need a distraction? Comfort? Control? How could you have gotten that need met in a non self-destructive way? And how can you take care of yourself in the future when these triggers come up again?

You don’t have to know the answer to all of these questions right now, but it’s important to start exploring and being curious.

4. Treat yourself like you would a friend.

If you had a friend or loved one who lapsed, you wouldn’t put them down. You wouldn’t call them a failure. You wouldn’t see them as worthless. And you wouldn’t discount all the progress they had made. You would treat them with kindness and compassion. You would give them a hug, remind them of how far they’ve come, and reassure them that just because they had one lapse doesn’t mean they can’t turn things around and get back on track. 

Well, you’re not an exception. You deserve to be treated with the same forgiveness and love you would so willingly give to anyone else who was struggling. So when your self-hating thoughts get loud and tell you that you’re a failure for lapsing, challenge them. And if in the moment it’s difficult to be nice to yourself, think of what you would say to someone you care about and apply those positive counters to your own thoughts. 

5. Reach out.

Don’t isolate and withdraw. It may feel safer, but it only perpetuates the pain you feel and keeps you stuck. In order to get back on track, you have to talk about what happened. You have to be honest with yourself and your support network. You have to give yourself permission to ask for help, use your voice, and make your needs known. Keeping secrets keeps us sick. If we want to heal, we have to break the silence. 

6. Get extra support.

If you’re struggling, you deserve to ask for help. Denying yourself extra support when things start going down hill isn’t noble or self-sacrificing. It’s self-destruction, and it’s a sure-fire way to put yourself at risk for another lapse. There is nothing shameful about asking for more help. It doesn’t make you weak. It doesn’t make you a disappointment. And it doesn’t make you a burden. It makes you someone with the courage to be honest and the strength to make recovery a priority. It makes you determined and admirable and brave. It’s self-care and in order to get back on track and heal, it’s imperative

7. Focus on progress, not perfection. 

One lapse does NOT discount all of the days you went without using behaviors. It doesn’t make you weak or incapable or inadequate. It doesn’t make you a failure or erase your progress, and it definitely doesn’t mean you can’t get better. All a lapse means is that you were hurting so deeply and didn’t know how else to cope. It was a bad decision, but it doesn’t make you a bad person. It makes you human. The lapse was just a bump in your road to recovery, but it doesn’t mean you have to start all over. You’re just continuing your journey right where you left off. So don’t give up. You will get to where you need to be in your own time. Until then, breathe, be patient, and trust that as long as you keep pushing forward, reaching out for help, and picking yourself back up, no matter how many times you lapse, you can and will recover.

(via queerkenosis)